Goat Wrestling Perseverance

Episode 40 - Mountain climbing, bicycling across America, combat Veteran Dave Swanson

July 13, 2019 Dave Swanson Season 2 Episode 40
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 40 - Mountain climbing, bicycling across America, combat Veteran Dave Swanson
Chapters
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 40 - Mountain climbing, bicycling across America, combat Veteran Dave Swanson
Jul 13, 2019 Season 2 Episode 40
Dave Swanson

SUPPORT THE PODCAST!

Dave Swanson has many credentials, here are a few:

  • 1000’s of People.
  • Many organizations.
  • Major Industries.
  • Best-Selling author.
  • Keynote speaker.
  • 100 Firefights in Combat.
  • Bicycled across America.
  • Climbed Mt. Rainier.
  • Toughest College in America.
  • Executive Coach.
  • Resiliency and Leadership Expert.
  • Dave’s LAW – Life, Adventure, Work.
  • Millennial whisperer.
  • Business Strategist.



Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/GWPPodcast)

Show Notes Transcript

SUPPORT THE PODCAST!

Dave Swanson has many credentials, here are a few:

  • 1000’s of People.
  • Many organizations.
  • Major Industries.
  • Best-Selling author.
  • Keynote speaker.
  • 100 Firefights in Combat.
  • Bicycled across America.
  • Climbed Mt. Rainier.
  • Toughest College in America.
  • Executive Coach.
  • Resiliency and Leadership Expert.
  • Dave’s LAW – Life, Adventure, Work.
  • Millennial whisperer.
  • Business Strategist.



Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/GWPPodcast)

Speaker 1:

[inaudible] . Welcome to goat wrestling perseverance podcast with your host, Dave Swanson. He's wrestled with goats, climbed mountains and bicycled across America. He wants to help you with your dreams and goals with one perseverance story at a time. [inaudible]

Speaker 3:

welcome to go wrestling perseverance podcast. I am Dave Swanson and I have been asked to do this episode many times and in this episode I'm going to give you the introduction here with our guests. He's been in a hundred firefights in Iraq. He is a junior college dropout , but he's also at West Point graduate, has an MBA from the University of Texas and he's currently doing his phd in leadership is also bicycled across America, 3,100 miles in 30 days for several nonprofits. He's climbed mount Reneer and he's an executive coach, a leadership expert , business strategist , bestselling author, keynote speaker, and that's right, the host of goat wrestling perseverance podcast. I'm sorry, I had to do the introduction just like we do for every show and as we know on this show and for the audience, that is who I am. That's Davis Watson and what I wanted to do was tell you a perseverance story for myself and this perseverance story. I've shared a few with the audience and also with the guests we've had on the show, but one of the stories that I have not shared, and I've only shared it with a few folks and that's generally the people that's been into preparatory school, the United States military academy. I've shared this story and I was a plebe or a freshman at west point and [inaudible] going into the files for that freshman year. That plebe year I had four s so if you followed along at home you would realize that yes, I did a job at a junior college job or my book the dot on the left. It was something about me becoming successful academically at the prep school and so you would think that we'll just roll into west point and things will get easier and that is not what happened. Actually what happened was that it got harder. Math was harder, the English classes were harder, chemistry was harder, and for all those who went to the academy, you understand you have all the other stuff to deal with. You have to do parades, you have to be on an intramural team, you have upperclassmen that will give you an understanding of what it means to go through and understand perseverance. When you decided to talk with friends out on the pad and you talk with other friends and they don't like it when you actually talk about things outside as a freshman. And so until you get recognized, it's a real challenge. And so going into the finals, I had four s four s and I know you won't see it on my transcript because somehow in this miracle I pulled it off and this is how I did it. I was really struggling two weeks before the finals were to happen. They're actually called term and exams, teas and all I wanted to do was just get to go home. I mean, I think at this point, your entire first semester, I'd had some great stories that happened. I've made some great friends that I'm still friends with today. But the thing you can't understand is the fact that it was a struggle. That was a real struggle and I always tried to do as much as I can do the same thing that I did at the prep school that led to success, but it just was not working at west point itself. And so the night before the first final [inaudible] , I decided to take a walk and when I took this walk, it was at night. I was stressing, I didn't know what to do and I had no idea where I was going to go. But I made my way over to trophy point and the one thing that I've found was this bench that actually had my name on it. It's the one thing we talk about every single time we turn around and that is perseverance. No , it didn't have days once and on the bend shed, that would have been nice and it would be nice in the future, but I'd have to become a little bit more legendary status if that was the case. But I am not as of this point, so perseverance still sits on that bench and over a true, if we point at this bench a perseverance. What it does is it overlooks the Hudson River and that was the first time that I sat there. I had actually prayed, I had thought about what I was doing and I thought about what I really wanted while I was on this journey and what I really wanted from west point and what I wanted to do in the future and it was there. I found it. It was there that I found Ahmed bench, why I should put all my effort into it and it was to lead soldiers in combat. I had no idea. Even at this time, this would have been the December of 1998 I had no idea, but I knew that eventually that it was going to lead soldiers and it eventually ended up being combat being in a hundred firefights and having 40 soldiers in my platoon, but I had no idea at that point. I just knew that that's what I wanted to do when I graduated. And I sat there for about 30 minutes on that perseverance bench and you could say I was avoiding my homework and I was avoiding studying for my teas , uh , which , uh , could be misperceived as somebody that doesn't have perseverance. But I really just got lost in my thoughts and what I really wanted to do. And so I took that with me every time I went into my finals. So the next semester I didn't have four F's. Thank God I didn't. But I always went out there as kind of a tradition. So each semester at the end of the year before our finals, before the teas , I would take 30 minutes and just reflect on what I really wanted. And each semester it didn't change. It was kind of solid that way. It was nice that it never changed, but I changed as a person each time. But the way I, in what I wanted to do when I graduated, that never changed. And okay , I get into sophomore year. Same thing happens. I struggled with one class, but not everything made it through there. I got better at school, you know, I understood how the whole system with athletics and with doing parades and doing everything with academics, I got better. You know how you hang around on a job long enough, you start to understand the ins and outs of it and now it's the same with west point. You just kind of have to gut it through and have perseverance in that first year. And that's what it was for me. It was sitting on that bench every semester right before the finals. And I did that even the night before I graduated from West Point where I had a, you would say interesting day. The next day my car got towed on graduation day. I miss my own graduation party. I miss my pinning ceremony. I had a, a pretty glorious graduation day. Uh, you know, it was bright out and I think I hung out the night before and it was pretty bright with the , the uniforms and don't really remember all that much of the message. But it was President Bush. I got to shake his hand. And so it was a challenging day of graduation, but I knew that those five years that I just spent were all worth it. I had no idea where it's going to take me, but I knew that the perseverance of sitting on the bench getting through west point prep school itself, that that was all for me and it was a shock. I had no idea coming out of high school then I would be able to accomplish something like that. And what that did for me, what confidence that gave me, I mean it always stems back to basketball or when I was younger that I always ended up getting this confidence. And it's so funny, we, we go through so many hardships in our life and we forget about that confidence we built . And as soon as I graduated from West Point, it starts all over again. Actually, you , you become a second lieutenant. Uh, there's not a lot of respect for officers at that rank when you go into the military and that's fine because you don't deserve it. But you need to have confidence. You need to have that kind of instilled into you when you go to your unit or where you show up and go into training. All of those things to be positive and have that mental attitude of this is a growth mindset. It's going to be a challenge. I'm going to struggle, but I'm going to persevere through this and you just have to take it one step at a time, one day at a time when we get a time, and before you know it, you end up getting through all the training. You get a through all the hardships of the problems that you have in life, whatever it is, and you end up thinking it's going to get easier. And then I ended up deploying in 2004 2005 where if you followed along, you know that the net long road home is a mini series on national geographic of where I was, an infantry pulled two liter and we were ambushed on black Sunday, which is April 4th, 2004 so you can go look that up. And so it didn't get easier. I just had to get better every single time that I went out and these things happened. So when I think about that bench, that perseveres bench that still sits at trophy point . So if you haven't been to west point and you plan on making a visit, please do you go to New York City? Just take one of the tour buses, whatever, to get out there. And if there's the first stop that you should take, it would be that persevered Spanish just to see it and understand that when you overlook the Hudson Valley, there's so many other places to go visit. The campus is so beautiful, especially when you're not going to school there. I say that as a joke because when you're there in four years, you have no chance to actually look around and appreciate the beauty of it. But when you graduate and look back at it, you can't find a better looking campus anywhere in the country, I think. And so that would be your first stop because there's all these feats of engineering that are there. The buildings, the library, the million dollar view, the trophy point, there's all these other great things that are there to look at. But the one thing that I go first to when I go back to my reunions or before I go to meet with any of my friends or people I know that are stationed there, I always visit my old friend, that bench that has my name on it called perseverance. And so with that, let's talk about what we're doing next. I mean this podcast on the juries and I chose to be the guest on my own podcast for this episode is cause it's number 40 40 episodes and a little over three months. And so that wouldn't have happened without my audience, without you guys all appreciating and contributing to the Patrion page, which I'll attach the episode details, five bucks for donating to the Patriot on page. We'll get you different material and content that we'll be sharing with that crowd. But not only that, it allows me to keep going and doing this podcast. I've had so much fun. I've learned so much from the guests I've had on here, but not only that, I want to continue on. This is not a, Oh, I'm going to get 30 done, 40 done, 80 a hundred done . I really enjoy this. This is so much fun interviewing people, learning from people. That's just something that's always going to happen for me. And so many of you don't know that the average is like three podcasts or seven podcasts where people quit seven episodes and people, some people get to the 30 mark, 40 mark and they just wonder, Hey , uh , am I even gonna get monetized for this? So people are still trying to find ways to get money out of this and if they don't make any money from advertisers and other things, they go ahead and quit. I never started this podcast for the money part of it and I started the podcast because I wanted to see how it was for me. It's been the most enjoyable experience learning from others. I think that's kind of something I've learned probably in the last six years about myself is that learning from other people, gaining knowledge from other people and then sharing it with other people like you and the audience has just been something I have enjoyed so much and so I'm continuing with the podcast , 40 episodes, two seasons. I already have guests lined up for season number three and they are just as amazing as the previous two seasons. And so thank you for joining me along this ride of doing something I'd never thought I would do and found a calling in it once I started doing it and I hope for you and what you're doing out there right now. I hope that's what this is, not just listening to the podcast, but you were working on something that is your calling. You know you should be doing it and if you're not doing that right now, I'm urging you, just start on it a step at a time because even the smallest step is going to lead you to where you want to go. It's an inch at a time. You never gain it by feet or yards, but it's an inch at a time and eventually those inches that up. And so this is David Swanson from goat wrestling, perseverance podcast . Thank you for being a listener. And I'll see you in [inaudible] .

Speaker 4:

Sorry .