Goat Wrestling Perseverance

Episode 28 - Enemy snipers can't stop this Marine: Justin Constantine with host Dave Swanson

June 11, 2019 Season 2 Episode 28
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 28 - Enemy snipers can't stop this Marine: Justin Constantine with host Dave Swanson
Chapters
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 28 - Enemy snipers can't stop this Marine: Justin Constantine with host Dave Swanson
Jun 11, 2019 Season 2 Episode 28
Dave Swanson / Justin Constantine

Justin is a Presidential Leadership Scholar, was named a Champion of Change for Veterans by President Obama, and also was awarded the prestigious inaugural 2014 Lincoln Award recognizing his outstanding achievement and excellence in providing opportunities and support to our nation’s veterans and military families. Justin was also one of the wounded warriors painted by President Bush in his book Portraits of Courage. In 2017, he received the Henry Viscardi Achievement Award for shaping attitudes, raising awareness and improving the quality of life for people with disabilities, as well as the Veterans Advantage HeroVet award for significantly contributing to the veteran community through ongoing service and leadership. In 2018, Justin received the Veteran Owned Business of the Year Award from The American Legion, Department of New Jersey.

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More about Justin

Dave Swanson

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Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

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Show Notes Transcript

Justin is a Presidential Leadership Scholar, was named a Champion of Change for Veterans by President Obama, and also was awarded the prestigious inaugural 2014 Lincoln Award recognizing his outstanding achievement and excellence in providing opportunities and support to our nation’s veterans and military families. Justin was also one of the wounded warriors painted by President Bush in his book Portraits of Courage. In 2017, he received the Henry Viscardi Achievement Award for shaping attitudes, raising awareness and improving the quality of life for people with disabilities, as well as the Veterans Advantage HeroVet award for significantly contributing to the veteran community through ongoing service and leadership. In 2018, Justin received the Veteran Owned Business of the Year Award from The American Legion, Department of New Jersey.

Books

More about Justin

Dave Swanson

Website

Book 

Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

Free Chapter of my Bestselling Book? 



Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/GWPPodcast)

Dave Swanson:
0:01
Welcome to goat wrestling perseverance podcast. Today I have a guest that is a presidential leadership scholar named by champion of change for veterans by President Obama. He's been awarded the 2014 Lincoln award, but not only that, he was painted in the book by President Bush importers. Portraits of courage. He was wounded in Iraq, but he has continued to give back through various outlets of public speaking. He has also written two books from we will to at will and my battlefield, your office. And today my guest is Justin Constantine. Justin, thank you for being on the show.
Dave Swanson:
0:55
Well, it shows the vigorous I so much for having me on your podcast.
Justin C:
0:58
All right. On goat wrestling, perseverance. We know we jumped right into the story. So Justin, please share this amazing, incredible story with the audience. Well, thanks. Yeah, I've been, yeah, I've been, um, I guess just real quick, I have, I served as a marine officer for 16 years. I ultimately retired medically retired in the rank of lieutenant colonel. Uh, I was a lawyer on active duty and the reserves, I can pull it to Iraq and she thousand six as a civil affairs team. We are. So I was in charge of a small team of marines attached to a large ring infantry retiring Campbell of June. We were in onboard probably since 2006, like where many marines were specifically and how the Nia in between Fallujah and Ramadi try and get our mind where there's a lot of heavy fighting going on. This just right before the surge of oh seven, we had troops in combat, every gay, uh, similar to what you experienced, not to that degree with similar to what you'll experience. Um, we were on a combat patrol on October 18 2006 we got through an area where when you went and we sniper was Outbrain kill some of our earnings in that area. In the past couple of weeks. We actually had countersign her team's out looking for him. He shot me in the back of the head. We had a reporter there with us at j and he just said to the reporter, who has seen scanning around earlier, not moving very much. I say, Hey, Jay gave a quick here, don't forget about that. Sniper, keep moving. He told me later that based on that he took a big step forward. Let's second layer, bullet came in with head, had them, I hit the wall between us before I could react and I tried to hit me behind the last year I suppose out of my mouth, causing incredible damage. The next round hit note, corporal behind me in his forehead should kill them, but miraculously a bounce up in San Goggles, which of course aren't designed for that. And record shade to side who's Not Dallas for a couple minutes and he ended up being fine. The marines saw had been killed. Um, when David Coleman came running over, he, he rolled me over. I was no longer at breathing. He was incredible. George Graham, he was able to form, rescue breathing on me and then coat my stroke, emergency me and keep me alive. Core hope your droving at 70 miles an hour down the road. And when you had [inaudible] on it, uh, if you hit one, he would have died. Javi say aviation and the doctors were incredible. Yeah. You know what to do. And this is unusual eight they Joelle's new protocols, which actually also going to say some other Marines as well kept me alive until they could get me to temple out airbase where the real er was. So that was just a quick 30 minute snapshot of what happened back 12 or 13 years ago. But that's where my whole life completely changed. And y'all, I'm a very different trajectory now.
Dave Swanson:
3:56
Well yeah that story. I mean you know that there's someone in the area and you're giving advice to other people and then here, you know, it's, it's tough when there's, you've got counter sniper teams out there looking for the guy and then you know, you get hit by this. I mean you, the thing about it that I, you know, as we had guys wounded as well is it's the people around you that help you get to where you need to be going. And that's such a difficult thing, you know, when dad, to know that you have amazing people around you and how they responded to it. How good of friends are you with those folks still today?
Justin C:
4:34
That yeah, I'm really close in particular with joy. She saved my life. Of course. In fact, I'm going to see him. Yes. Week I'm being honored by Marine Corps, the silent drill team. Yeah. Michael Hill and he, he's one of my guests for that, but I'm also the battalion commander [inaudible] who also was right there on that patrol gradual whole saved my life. He almost got shot also that day. Um, he's been shot other times, so I had to distinguish that guy. But um, so I'm still close with both of them and then to a much less to integrate some of the other guys there that Jay. But you're right, I wouldn't be here if it weren't for the people will find it up. Things that are right. And that's what we tried your most. And military. I think that when, you know, people around us have our backs 24, seven and it's hard to find that someplace else.
Dave Swanson:
5:25
No, that was actually the point I was about to make is, you know, since both of us had been out, uh, you, you know, 2006 I got out in 2007 the hardest thing is to find those people that are truly going to support you, be happy for you. You know, we talked about that a little bit, you know, to, to find that small group, that core of people to really trust and you know, support each other. And like you said, it's a struggle to do then for the audience that's out there that hasn't been in the military, they don't know what they're even missing, I think at some point. But for you, you know, how do, how do you make that, you surround yourself with those kind of, right people that you know, are there for good intentions, that are really, you know, they're just supportive. How do, how do you find it and make sure you surround yourself with that?
Justin C:
6:09
Yeah, the is critical and I'm glad we're talking about, hey guys, just take a very conscious effort. Perfect. Um, you know, since I was in here who was incredibly fortunate to survive, somebody should kill me. I have a slightly different ads, you know, where it's, I don't want to be like a pinball, just reacting to whatever life sends me. I want to be very conscious and very thoughtful about how I spend my time. I don't want to waste a second of my time and I w I only wanted to engage with people who, uh, who I trust and who are sick and who has similar values to me, whether that's personally or the business. And often there is an over that there. So I, I guess I bump into people all the time who I think might be trying to use me for something or we might just have bad motives. I don't, I don't spend time with them. I purposely, uh, pick who I choose to spend my time with people, whoever sets. And that's where I dedicate my time and efforts. I'm very happy to help many other people because I'm only still here because so many people help me along the way. So that's not an issue. But I do believe that we should take control of agency of our lives. A big part of that is choosing how we spend our time and who are specialists. So that is something, it's very important to me.
Dave Swanson:
7:31
Yeah. You said something that I think is should be pointed out to the audiences that to be deliberate with your actions on a daily basis and you know, long term basis and giving back in and continuing to help people. I think that's, that's not always a common thing, especially after what you've been through. I mean to be hit by a sniper, you know, probably had the longest recovery time to give back to just, you know, being able to do the normal stuff. And here you are still giving back, you know, helping veterans, helping other people talk about that mindset a little bit. Like that kind of positivity, that optimism that you use, you know, I mean, what were you thinking as you're, you're laying in bed, I'm guessing you made it to Germany at some point and you're lost soul and wait, what? I mean, what do you thinking about like 13 years from now I'm going to be helping people still are, you know, it's, that's not the mentality, but something, something inside of you made you stay positive. What, what was that?
Justin C:
8:31
Yeah. Um, you're right, I gave you go Jolanta shore for four days. Yeah. And onto the naval hospital in Bethesda. And then after that most of my chair actually was at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, a gunshot victims there. They have two extra efforts on that. And so you're right, this is the last thing I was thinking about. I've had dozens at center, unlike many other wounded warriors. And I was very fortunate that my girlfriend, who's now my wife, put her life on the whole, got everything, come be with me, uh, and have made a huge impact on my recovery. And it's something I don't take for granted. And, you know, look to her as, wow, she did this from a, you know, I think I can do that for other people as well. And I'll just say that my, my recovery like many other wounded warriors has not been a straight line. It's, there'd been high points on an oak points and you're probably familiar that I'm sure a lot of the folks in your platoon or familiar without work, you know, we have good days and bad days and at the beginning it was really art. Uh, I did go to counseling for PTSD for 18 months, weekly one on one meetings, 40 hour with a psychologist. Yeah. Huge difference in my recovery, but also the fact of giving back and spending my time helping others who are struggling or, or just you're talking to someone, that's very therapeutic for me as well. Uh, getting back to work, which a big part of my recovery because once where I felt like I was a contributing member of society and taking care of my family, that has a big effect. So I've, I've found that being productive and being a mentor for other quotes, it helps me to, now I don't, I don't, I don't try to send an all my time on that because I have a business Saranya and things like that. But, um, I do take volunteer work very seriously. I and I, I think it's a great way to meet others and to provide a helping hand. You right. I wasn't thinking about this 13 years ago, but, but it's important because essentially our veteran community, we take care of our own. There's a lot of folks who slipped through the cracks and I hate to think I could have prevented something. I picked up the phone call and not taking the time to do that.
Dave Swanson:
10:47
So to be optimistic, you, you were productive, you were a mentor, but I think you left out a pretty key point here is that you are a role model for others. And so even if you don't think that you're a role model, you've default become a role model and you've done a great job with that and you continue to do a great job with that. You're leading a group called your job path.com I think last year you, you got 16,000 jobs for veterans out there. I think you've got 200,000 veterans right now that are, you know, trying to get jobs. You guys are actively trying to help them. Talk a little bit about that because that's your next thing that you're doing. Your your top pat.com
Justin C:
11:26
please talk job pass and like you said, website [inaudible] dot com we're a tech company at our core, a Wellesley visit San six years ago and $2 million and 5 cents and we double and triple the amount of money we put back to them five forms, so we're not like other five points because first of all everything of course free for veterans and their spouses and family members, but we're, we're a one stop shop where we don't actually, she adds it. Go to six different places to find everything you need. You can create a resume on our site. We have a very robust mentorship platform, was thousands of mentors. We have a Wii, the only veteran transitioning dash, which we hope will start being used in all the tap classes where by creating a quick profile, you get notified every day on your phones who are app of all the jobs in your area, um, based on your own west or your career interests, catastrophe time. It's completely different. A notification is monthly notifications about your security clearance, find , spire, certification is that you're eligible for that you never learned about when you were in the Military Gi bill of information via information. So all there in one place on APP, on a computer, however you want it updates every single day. So we believe that, um, technology, it's not the be all and end goal with a really important piece of the solution to be scalable. And so every single veteran has a customized solution. So w you know, from employers, we have either a series about hiring veterans. I wrote a book on that last year. We have a true mos translator that's really intelligent artificial intelligence correctly, unlike a lot of the other five points out there. And so we're gonna throw over the results and it's not just us, we partner and what like, well, we want everyone to have the benefit of that. So if you've got a paralyzed veterans of America, I Work Air Force Association or hope for the lawyer and charge who stocked them, which they're all using our platform, we white and they look for them. So all the veterans that are coming in systems and how they're entering, they all get to see the benefits of that. All of them [inaudible] great to see all the veterans who come and you got on the backend. That's why we're talking about such big numbers. And really for me it's like I said earlier, getting back to work, that's a big part of my recovery. So to help sound that veterans get jobs and careers at a tear about, uh, not ones who are going to leave at six months at ones are good fit for them and where they're trying to go. That means a lot to me. And so to see our continued success as we grow, uh, every month, it's really inspiring to me.
Justin C:
14:07
Well, it can only be such a good platform if you're signing clients like apple. Was that correct? I mean, you, you're working with apple. This is not, oh, you know, one offs or small companies. These are, these are big things that he's doing out there and your job path.com I'm glad that you're out there and the technology intersecting with transition. I think that's a, it's such an amazing concept. So Justin, thank you for being on the show today. I greatly appreciate you being here. Thank you for your service and looking forward to seeing what you're doing next.
Dave Swanson:
14:39
No, thank you. Again. Like I said, it's honor be on your show. I know you'll interview a lot of other great people, so I'm really just honored to be included in that and I appreciate the opportunity to highlight when I'm working on.
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