Goat Wrestling Perseverance

Episode 38 - Hall of Fame Speaker, #1 Anthropologist and Adventurer and Argentinian Gaucho Dr. Jeff Salz with host Dave Swanson

July 10, 2019 Dave Swanson / Dr. Jeff Salz Season 2 Episode 38
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 38 - Hall of Fame Speaker, #1 Anthropologist and Adventurer and Argentinian Gaucho Dr. Jeff Salz with host Dave Swanson
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Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 38 - Hall of Fame Speaker, #1 Anthropologist and Adventurer and Argentinian Gaucho Dr. Jeff Salz with host Dave Swanson
Jul 10, 2019 Season 2 Episode 38
Dave Swanson / Dr. Jeff Salz

In 2013 he was awarded the greatest honor of the speaking profession – induction in the the National Speakers Association “Speakers Hall of Fame”.

Acclaimed “America’s leading anthropologist/adventurer” by the Discovery Network and the History Channel, Dr. Jeff is equally at home sharing stories with gauchos around a campfire in Patagonia… leading C-Suite executives around a boardroom table in Silicon Valley … or coaching young presenters on a stage in his home town of Encinitas, California.

His latest book, The Age of Adventure – A Unique Exploration of the Aging Process will be published by Blooming Twig books in the Fall of 2016.
PhD in cultural anthropology
Masters degree in experiential education
10 years as a university professor
Guest adventure expert for CBS Early Morning Show
Discovery, Travel and History Channel film-maker and host
Creativity consultant for The Lion King production team
Best selling author, adventurer and explorer
Only man to successfully circumnavigate Lake Titicaca in a reed boat
Leader of over 100 international expeditions
Horseback traverses of Outer Mongolia, Tibet, Andes of Southern Chile, Patagonia, Siberia and the Tien Shan Mountains of western China

Jeff's Bio

Book

Dave Swanson

Website

Book 

Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

Free Chapter of my Bestselling Book? 

Show Notes Transcript

In 2013 he was awarded the greatest honor of the speaking profession – induction in the the National Speakers Association “Speakers Hall of Fame”.

Acclaimed “America’s leading anthropologist/adventurer” by the Discovery Network and the History Channel, Dr. Jeff is equally at home sharing stories with gauchos around a campfire in Patagonia… leading C-Suite executives around a boardroom table in Silicon Valley … or coaching young presenters on a stage in his home town of Encinitas, California.

His latest book, The Age of Adventure – A Unique Exploration of the Aging Process will be published by Blooming Twig books in the Fall of 2016.
PhD in cultural anthropology
Masters degree in experiential education
10 years as a university professor
Guest adventure expert for CBS Early Morning Show
Discovery, Travel and History Channel film-maker and host
Creativity consultant for The Lion King production team
Best selling author, adventurer and explorer
Only man to successfully circumnavigate Lake Titicaca in a reed boat
Leader of over 100 international expeditions
Horseback traverses of Outer Mongolia, Tibet, Andes of Southern Chile, Patagonia, Siberia and the Tien Shan Mountains of western China

Jeff's Bio

Book

Dave Swanson

Website

Book 

Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

Free Chapter of my Bestselling Book? 

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/GWPPodcast)

Speaker 1:

Welcome to goat wrestling perseverance podcast with your host, Dave Swanson. He's wrestled with goats, climbed mountains and bicycled across America. He wants to help you with your dreams and goals with one perseverance story at a time.

Speaker 4:

welcome to goat wrestling perseverance podcast. Today I'm here with a guest who was nominated and selected for a hall of Fame Speaker in 2013 he is widely considered America's leading anthropologist and adventure. He has a phd in anthropology. He was a professor for 10 years at San Diego State. He was the consultant on the lion king production team, which I always find impressive, but not only that, he is also been a leader of a hundred international expeditions. He is a concert for CVS, discovery history channel travel channel, and he was also an adventure expert on survivor and today my guest Jeff Sols has been on the show and I'm excited to hear what you have to say from Ecuador.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm excited to hear what I have to say as well.

Speaker 4:

All right. As the audience knows on goat wrestling, perseverance, we jump right into the five minutes story. And so this perseverance story is going to take a twist and I'm excited to hear it.

Speaker 1:

You're okay. Well, you know, all honesty, I just started thinking about 10 minutes ago. What I want to talk about in terms of perseverance. And you know, I like to put a little, little twist on things and I, I, I, I'll start with the moral of the story. Uh, just cause that's ass backwards. And, and the moral of the story is that sometimes we're so busy persevering that we could charge right past the place we do want it to go because we didn't notice it. And, uh, so perseverance, well definitely it's an attribute. It can also be a detriment unless we're keenly aware of the moment. So my story in five minutes or less, uh, something really changed my life. I was, um, traveling as a Gaucho couches or that cowboy's of South America. And I always wanted to be sort of a cowboy and it was a hundred years too late here, but I was kind of a dying for Argentina back in the probably the 1980s.

Speaker 1:

And next thing I knew, I had my, um, my, my, my whole outfit, I had my hat and my baggy pants and I had my spurs and I got two very big horses. And, um, I'm cruising around just kind of living out to life. And the idea was I've seen these people when I was mountain climbing in Patagonia way back in the 70s. And you just see them kind of riding up and they're wearing these amazing outfits and these giant horses. And they, they just looked like something out of a movie and they, they obviously know the meaning of life. And so my goal was this time not to climb mountains, but, uh, to do this adventure for months, as long as it took to ask these Gaucher's, the meaning of life, they just had that steely look in their eye. And you know, Gaucho was a word that comes from a twill g Indian, which means a watcher, which means kind of maverick or a wild offspring.

Speaker 1:

So there, there, there they play guitar and they, they carry these big knives and they live alone. And in Argentina to be a, Gaucho was the ultimate compliment. It call someone a Gaucho. It's like kind of neat is called a Gal. Chowdah do me a Gaucho saying. So anyway, there I am feeling like I'm a Gaucho looking like I'm a galaxy, but really just being this frightened kid from New Jersey who doesn't like horses, but I'm going and I'm doing it and you know, a lot of perseverance just doing the thing that you're afraid to do until you stop being afraid to do it. And then you get to where you're used to doing it and then you got to do the next thing. But I was still on that curve kind of going up hill. These horses are big. I didn't have a saddle. A horse initially didn't know how to pack a pack horse.

Speaker 1:

So I'm going on and I'm doing this for months writing. It's like being in the old west, going from hosti ended a hotsy ended, the column of Stanzi is down there. You know, people never hadn't seen the outsider before. But a, I finally find this guy, I'm trying to lie, this a fire in the middle of nowhere. You know when storm and I can't get it going. And this guy rides up and he's on a big horse and he's got these piercing blue eyes. The Guy, not Dolores. And he's looking at me, you know, and I'm looking up at him, he looks at me and he says, you are not from here. And I go, no, I'm not from here. I'm from New Jersey. And he says, I just no idea what that means. He says, but I will tell you the meaning of life just as a credit and how does this guy even notice say that.

Speaker 1:

And then I said, what is your name? He says, my name is Loco Rivera. And this does not bode well, right local Rivera. But to make the story short, because I know you only want me to do five minutes on this, but I want to follow in this guy to a shack. And he lives in this three walls shack because to have four walls would be a house and a Gaucho's home as the back of his horse. And so he lives this way. He lives wildly, you know, he's, he's proud of being dirty and smelly and living in the wilds. And so, uh, in fact I, um, I asked him, isn't it hardly but out here, do you ever have a close friend? And he said, well, you one of my closest friends, cause I was only about three feet away. So I said, do you ever have anybody else? He said, Oh yes, I had a very good friend. Her name was sparky. Really? Who was sparky? She was my skunk. I said, blow the skunk for a friend. You know, it wasn't that kind of hard, you know? Oh No, no, no, it was no problem. She, she lived with me under my bed. I said, wasn't there a terrible smell? And he said, Oh yes, but you fucking got used to it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, exactly. It takes this episode he had, he was this, and anyway, so it came time for me to leave because I realized this guy was very kind. He was very something about it, but he was kind of nuts, right? So as I'm leaving, he literally grabs my horse, stops me and says, I would tell you the meaning of life. Well, what is it? There's no place to go and there's nothing to do except to be of service. And a, and I say, well that's, that's well and good, but, um, that's not what I'm looking for. So I ride off and I say goodbye and sure enough, I get caught in a snow storm and my horse is a runaway. I run out of food, but tenent collapses. I'm soaking wet and I'm literally, sure I'm going to die and I don't die in any of my buy stories, Dave.

Speaker 1:

So don't worry. But I wind up crawling, literally crawling back to my horses, run away. I'm willing. Call it through the snow for two days. I get back to the shack right where, where he is. And, uh, and he's not there, you know, in fact, that the shack had, had been basically dismantled. So now I'm really in trouble. And then I see this rider coming toward me and he's, he's this local Rivera. And I say, how'd you know I was coming? They said, well, you're harshly went by about two days ago. And, uh, but this thing had happened to me when I was calling through the snow, where I realized that I didn't, I was dumb. I didn't have to put my life in jeopardy one more time. That what I really wanted was to somehow be back among my people. I want to somehow I thought about the life.

Speaker 1:

I hadn't finished living the students. I hadn't finished teaching the lover. I'd never truly found, you know, and then if I really did survive, all I want to do was make it back to my world and do it differently. Do it with a sense of love and my heart. So he looks at me down and he's on his horse, you know, and uh, he says, so you must ride my horse. And I said, I can't ride your horse. Cause if I ride you're going to have to walk. And gauchos don't walk. And he says to me, my friend, you have become a Getu. So he puts me on his horse, we're walking along and he says to me, I'm so, uh, where did you go? And I said, nowhere. What did you do? I said, nothing. So what is the meaning of life? I said, I guess just, just to be of service.

Speaker 1:

And uh, he said, let's go back to my camp and I, I'll tell you a story about my friends, Starkey, the skull they would ever do to that story. So the point of my story is that, you know, I, it took me almost dying. I mean you have to almost die in pursuit of something you really believe in to discover that maybe somewhere along the way you heard we needed to hear, but you were so enamored of the journey of the adventure of the persevering that you couldn't actually absorb it. And this case, you know, I, I wound up going home from this trip. I, you know, I still climbing adventure but now I'm not confused anymore that it really here, it wasn't the person that climbs the mountain or rides across Patagonia. No horse is the person that comes home and makes the difference in the world around them. So it's a, it's a, to me it's a mixture of perseverance and, and surrender. Surrendered to what comes your way as a gift.

Speaker 4:

Well you know, I mean to think of the audience and it happens quite a bit, is that shyness of wanting to beat something so bad, you know, you wanted that, you wanted it to be a Gaucho or at least consider the Gauchos so bad that you're willing to go through all of that to, to sleep on the ground, to ride a horse constantly. Cause that's where your home is going to be. And then you meet the crazy Rivera that's loco, right. And then he's telling you that's not life. And it's so funny that juxtaposition of what that is for you. And I think that to be of service. What was the first thing you mentioned a few things, uh, being a teacher coming back and, and you know, leading these, you know, journeys outside and adventure, doing all this stuff. What was kind of the first thought like to be of service that went on? You know, once you got back to, you know, back to the country, you know, United States and, and doing all this stuff that you did?

Speaker 1:

Well, you know, I, I, I kind of thought that my life was about going somewhere and being other than, and I came back with the realization that I really didn't have to go anywhere. Sometimes going away, going on an adventure can be an escape. It can actually be an adventure, could be an addiction that ultimately the hardest thing we do sometimes is look at the world around us and say, how can I make a significant difference in this world the way I am with the people I'm with? So I think the biggest realization was that I, that I needed to be present in my own life, uh, that it was easy to go on doing things, but to really process, integrate, met, saying goodbye to my identity is an adventure in some ways, but becoming more an adventure of, of the spirit of the intellect and to be of service. I mean, I think you play all the games in the world. You accrue large amounts of money in big houses and whatever your dream is and it's empty climbing, Mount Everest, whatever, it doesn't matter until you recognize the only game that really brings a sense of, of worth and contentment and joy is, is how we can turn our adventures, our experiences into something that's of service to another.

Speaker 4:

We know being in the military for 12 years, that's one of those things is basically every two to three years you move, you go onto a new adventure. So the military itself, and I do have a lot of military listeners in the audience and you know, you get addicted to that. It's like every two to three years, you don't realize staying in the same place. And I've found that out being here in Austin, being here in Texas, that you find this network of people that you know, trustworthy people that you help each other, you're of service to each other. You do all this stuff for it, but if you move on, you know you're kind of out of sight, out of mind. And if you do that every two to three years, you can't provide the service that you really could have done if you'd just stayed in the same place.

Speaker 4:

And that's something that I've really had to learn myself. And you know, my wife could tell you that like, I'm, I'm very much the adventure like you. Like every year I, I enjoy these events. You know, earlier in the year I went to the Elton John's Oscars party that I have to go, no, but it was a once in a lifetime thing and I went to go do it. But bringing that knowledge back and sharing what I've learned and this entrepreneurship training, that's what the service was, you know, going to do the training. The event was fun, but you've got to do all these events. You know, you've been to all these shows, you've done all these things and to be of service is, I love that. I'd love that advice, but that's crazy. Rivera's advice. Right from that, what did you turn to be of service? What was, what's kind of your advice that you give people when you go to speak?

Speaker 1:

That's all right. Well, I mean it's, it's kind of that, it's, it's that do the thing that, well, a friend of mine, Jeff Lowe is perhaps the greatest ice climber in his entire this'll world. He, he first soloed the north face of the Eiger in winter. Incredible feat. And he wound up, he's no longer with us. He died recently. He had a neurological disorder, kind of like Lou Gehrig's disease. And I got to speak with him towards the very end of his life. And I asked him that question, you know, what's the best advice you can give? And my advice winds up being what Jeff told me. And he said, always do the thing that you really want to do when you want to do it. Because later on you will want to do it and you'll wish you had. So it's his, he didn't say you won't, you won't be able to, which is kind of obvious, but you're really won't want to.

Speaker 1:

So you say all the things that I've done, I think on my advice would be do it. Pursue your crazy hunches, your dreams, your desires, explore yourself, explore the world when you want to because later on in life, I think naturally the, the evolution, the sort of the, the um, the transformation is we do become wiser. And with that wisdom comes you awareness that fulfillment in life comes from being observant. But unless you filled your life all about rates as events and understanding experiences, you won't have as much to offer in terms of wisdom or knowledge. So it's a, it's a beautiful thing. Trusting life, do the wild, crazy adventures and know that ultimately you'll be there having something to offer others. It kind of makes the whole thing work.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, I think it's, you know, the, to reshape those words, it's kind of walk this world without a life of her gut. You know, you, we talk about people you know, that are passing away or you talk about and they always talk about the things they should have done at the moment they had it. And you know, I think that's, that's the right thing to, to walk this world without any regret. And you've kind of done some of that and your discussion in your book, you know, talking about, you know, way of the adventure, transform your life and work with spirit and vision. You want to talk a little bit more about that and what kind of that book was done and you know it, it came out a few years ago, but it's still so applicable to what people were going out there doing today.

Speaker 1:

Well, I think the fun of that book is that I was published by John Wiley initially and they wanted a business book. So I said, how could I, I take these lessons from like local Rivera's in that my climbs and pedagogy, but it seemed like there were a lot of lessons that we draw from like your, your, your, your battle experience. I mean there some of us who have been really on the front lines that I've had in life, a period of [inaudible] and Panorama and technicolor and, and most people won't wind up on the face of Mount Fitzroy and Patagonia or, or in the front lines in a war zone. But if we can serve by taking those experiences, sort of distilling them, pulling out wisdom that we gained for those that will probably never be in those situations. And again, where web service. So this book was really a book for those who are in business, starting a business. How do to take the spirit of adventure and utilize it to find the powers of perseverance and the inspiration to be successful.

Speaker 4:

Well, Jeff, thank you so much for being on the show to be of service as something I'm going to take away. And I think that, you know, I just want to let the audience know that since I've started this podcast and about 40 episodes, and I get to learn from every single person that comes on this show, and I hope that that's what they're taking away with it as well. And so, uh, great stories. I love it. Look over Vera. I think he's, uh, probably a living legend somewhere. And so, uh, proud to call you a Gaucho as well. Jeff, thank you for being on the show.

Speaker 1:

My great pleasure, David, and good luck in all your endeavors.