Goat Wrestling Perseverance

Episode 34 - Fastest growing influencer on LinkedIn Shay Rowbottom and host Dave Swanson

June 23, 2019 Dave Swanson Season 2 Episode 34
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 34 - Fastest growing influencer on LinkedIn Shay Rowbottom and host Dave Swanson
Chapters
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 34 - Fastest growing influencer on LinkedIn Shay Rowbottom and host Dave Swanson
Jun 23, 2019 Season 2 Episode 34
Dave Swanson

I turn founders and executives into LinkedIn video creators | 👑 Content Queen | ⤵️ PM me to learn more! ⤵️

Contact Shay

Follow on LinkedIn

Dave Swanson

Website

Book 

Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

Free Chapter of my Bestselling Book? 

Show Notes Transcript

I turn founders and executives into LinkedIn video creators | 👑 Content Queen | ⤵️ PM me to learn more! ⤵️

Contact Shay

Follow on LinkedIn

Dave Swanson

Website

Book 

Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

Free Chapter of my Bestselling Book? 

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/GWPPodcast)

Announcer:

Welcome to goat wrestling perseverance podcast with your host, Dave Swanson. He's wrestled with goats, climbed mountains and bicycled across America. He wants to help you with your dreams and goals with one perseverance story at a time.

Dave Swanson:

welcome to goat wrestling perseverance podcast. Today I have a guest who is absolutely one of the fastest growing influencers on linkedin. And not only that, she also made it through the first round of American idol, which with my voice, I had no concept of being able to actually sing and get through that. But today I just want us to tell you that our guests is doing so many great things for entrepreneurs, founders and executives and turning them into linkedin video creators. She's known as the content queen and her name is Shae robot them shade. Thanks so much for being on the show today.

Shay Rowbottom:

Thank you Dave for having me.

Dave Swanson:

All right, I'll miss show. Everyone knows in the audience that we jumped right into the story. So I think I know this story as well, but I'm pretty sure the audience wants to hear it as well.

Shay Rowbottom:

Yeah. So, uh, you know, I first got into, um, the social media world and creating content for blogs online in 2016. Um, I was, let's see, 23 and actually I, I, if you've been following me, you know that I used to be a musician, so I was, you know, I dropped out of school, I was waitressing at the time and I'm working on my music, so that's in really go anywhere, uh, not as I had planned anyways. So I ended up coming across an opportunity to create video content for large, uh, pages on Facebook actually. And it really sparked my interest. I knew that a lot of these page owners were also college drop outs, no good making tons of money, just monetizing their following online and was really eager to break into that world. But it was like so scared to quit my job, which is funny cause I mean, it was just a serving job, but for me that was like all I knew, you know, I was a young adult. I had bounced around from so many crappy jobs, like so many, like I was a dishwasher, like I did, you know, um, not, not the most fun. So when I found that serving job and it was actually like at a steakhouse and it was very consistent and very reliable and I grew to really like, you know, the clientele and I just got comfortable there. That was really like the first, I would say like the first stable job I had as a young adult where I was just like, I was just, it was easy. I could pay my bills consistently. I was like relieved and um, even though it might seem small, it was actually like something I was proud of, you know, that I had, uh, you know, achieved my own, my own income and I was all independent and everything. So I got really comfortable with that life and it kind of like a wake up call when I wasn't doing so great with my music and wasn't, you know, able to monetize that as successfully as I had hoped. So I wasn't going to be able to quit my serving job anytime soon, you know, and I knew I had to switch directions. So this Facebook opportunity and learning more about social media, which I had been a user on social media, but it never really known like the back end, like you know who who makes means like who does all this. So it was really cool to get like submerged in that world and learn from a bunch of like awesome page owners that just had a really great understanding on how to grow a following online and how to monetize. But like I said, it was really scary because I knew to commit fully and to create a business out of it, you know, I had to quit my job and I had to really, um, be fully present in that. So that was really hard and it took a lot because technically I was not making as much money in my business starting out than I had grown comfortable with waitressing. So it was kind of like, you know, that scary step backwards that people talk about. But it was totally worth it in the long run and that ultimately led me to where I am today.

Dave Swanson:

I think one of the things that you addressed that is the hardest for that person is to understand the level of security. Like I mean, you know, level of security for you at that time and at your age was working at a steak house and it was consistent. And for a lot of the people out in the audience, you know, you think about, uh, you know, they're, they're, they're thinking about going out on their own with six figure jobs and having mortgages and families and all that stuff. And so how do you mix this two together? Because that's who we're talking about is it's not just, you know, for, for people in their 20s or thirties this is, this is a statement in story you're telling for people in their forties 50s, 60s saying, I've done being with security, I'm ready to move on. How do you know, because you do work with founders and people that are just coming out, what's kind of that first step? You say, okay, calm down. What is it like, what's your method of like getting these people?

Shay Rowbottom:

Yeah, well you have like be comfortable with the uncomfortable. So being that I was young and there wasn't really like much to lose, you know, I didn't have a family to support. I don't have children. Like um, I do think it's easier to take that leap, but I also think if you just reframe everything to understand that luck, look you are gonna have pain and discomfort in life. You can either concentrate that like pain and that discomfort right now and, and quit your job and go through that scary phase and push through to build a business so that your future, you don't have that discomfort at all actually. And you experience life on a level that most people dream of, or you could take pain and discomfort that's inevitable anyways and spread it out across your whole life and just kind of like go through the motions and stay in your current secure position, but ultimately arrive at a point where you probably would have just rather, you know, concentrated the discomfort and push through early on so that you could end up in a different spot.

Dave Swanson:

You know, it's interesting that as you're talking about, you know, just some people don't get what they want to do for their life. You know, you always hear that saying, I don't even know what I want to do when I grow up. And I have friends in the military have friends that retire out of the military and different people and you know, they're in their thirties they're in their forties and they're just like, I don't, I still don't know what I want to do when I grow up. I was told to me being successful was working at a corporation, doing the 40 hours a week for 40 years of my life. Everything's going to be great having this family. And then they stopped to think about it and they're like, why did I define that kind of success for myself? That's what I was told. Yes, exactly. When was kind of that moment for you, you said, you know, you did quit your job and you said, I define this is what I think success would look like for me. What was kind of, did somebody kind of mentor you? Did you have somebody point you or do, was there like a sign that kind of did it for you?

Shay Rowbottom:

Um, honestly I was pretty alone. Like I think I just always had, I don't, I don't know like where the like rebellion or the risk taker in me came from. I guess it was just kind of always naturally in there. Um, but definitely like it, I did get sucked in to the like expectations that others were putting on me and I did kind of get sucked into like going to college for Awhile to appease my parents and stuff. But I had actually, you know, pretty early on realized like, okay, in order to be the 1% you have to do what the 99% is not willing to do. And that made it very easy for me to carve a path less traveled and feel okay about it cause it is kind of lonely and scary and you're kind of like you, you do believe, but you still have that doubt in your head. Like will this really work? Well I regret it. You know? Um, so yeah, I think early on I just, I had a sense for like what the crowd did and I watched like how easy it was for people to just follow the crowd and not challenge things. And I just kind of realize like, oh, the only reason people aren't like challenging this or trying something different that could potentially be more effective is just because they want to fit in. And it's just that herd mentality. We all, no one wants to rock the boat. We all want to be loved and accepted a, that's like a basic human need. So I think it is really, it can be hard to go against that grain, but I just naturally have done it.

Dave Swanson:

Well that's something interesting that you just said that you know, you go from something secure, something too risky, but where was that moment? You know, you go from self doubt to where like I can do this. Something happened like you landed a big client or you realize you got, I think you have a video of 70 plus million views. What was it that kind of, you said, I can do this and I got it. Like what was that kind of, you felt that moment and it just, you know, it shook you. Like I got this and everybody else's doubts, your own doubts kind of just subsided. I know there may not be that pinpoint, but

Shay Rowbottom:

yeah, no, I think, I do actually think in a way what you're describing for some people is rock bottom. So, like for me, I went to a really rough time in college the first time I dropped out of college, you know, um, there was like some traumatic experiences I had and it just, I just like was low, like very, very depressed down, you know, the voice in the back of my head that was constantly telling myself like, you know, you don't really want to be here at college. This isn't really you. You're not chasing your dreams. That was like pushed to the forefront because I was just hitting rock bottom. I was so depressed. I was not doing good in school. I was not doing good in life. Uh, it just hit me like, it just clicked. Like, dude, like if you're going to be miserable, go be miserable. At least trying to be a musician because that's what you want, you know, and at least try to follow your creative voice because that's who you really are and you're not living that right now. You're not living that highest purpose. Um, and it didn't necessarily happen overnight. I do think though, there was like a pivotal moment when I dropped out of school. Um, and, and really started putting myself out there, started releasing some of my songs, started getting some like local shows. Gosh, that was scary. Like getting over that initial hump, like that first month of like self promotion and quote unquote marketing. Cause who knows what I was even doing at the time. But, um, yeah, like I, I just pulled myself out of it and then, okay, believe it or not, even though I do talk about how music really only ended up leading me to social media as opposed to me having direct success through my music, I actually do think getting through the hitting rock bottom and going and doing music within like six months, I was the happiest I'd been in years just because I was chasing my dreams. You know?

Dave Swanson:

So you go from college, you pivot to music, you pivot to becoming a waitress, and then you pivot to marketing. Yes. Is there a chance that you pivot back to music after you get more settled in and you get more security because your business is going well? Is there a chance that happens?

Shay Rowbottom:

Thank you for asking that, Dave. Yes. Uh, that is the plan. I do think that being sort of like just a video creator and having my creativity, my outlet in that format has actually shown me that I can impact people on a greater level than most, you know, just being a musician can, I can really like expand, you know, my artistic ability to reach even more people. So I'm actually really grateful for the opportunity to, you know, work on social media and become a influencer, you know, because it's shown me that I do still want to do music. You know, I do eventually want to release songs and um, even do shows and really work on that side of me. But I also have all these other ideas in my head now for how I can have an influence in how I can get my message out there outside of just music, which is actually like a beautiful thing too.

Dave Swanson:

Yeah, I think it's coinciding, right? I mean music along with what you're doing in influencing and not only that, you're actually looking to educate people that are trying to get on linkedin with the six week bootcamp that you're putting out there. I think you can find it on Shay robot on.com but talk a little bit more about that. Like, you know, you want to see people succeed. I think that's the hardest thing. You know, you want to be, you want to do music, you want to do influencing and social media, but you're still out there trying to help people through education online as well. So talk a little bit about that and you know, where people can find you and do all of that.

Shay Rowbottom:

Yeah, absolutely. Well, you know, this has really been my area of expertise is content marketing and creating video content. Um, four pages online. So for me, you know, it was kind of a no brainer to start my linkedin business just because, well, the best, what do they say? You know, the best salesman believe in their product. I, Linkedin just transformed my life. I mean, it transformed my business first and then it really took my life in a different direction. It's, it's given me so much opportunity, um, my company, you know, so much opportunity. I want to be able to provide that value to other businesses and other individuals and companies that might not have it quite figured out. You know, maybe they're doing content, but it's just not effective. It's not actually reaching their target. It's not getting them leads. You know, I, I've done this here and now I want to share that with everyone else.

Dave Swanson:

Well, I think one of the coolest things you have is your Hashtag is shea shine, right? Like the representation of a sunshine in what you're doing. And I think you know, it, it's brilliant. You know, Linkedin, the linkedin bootcamp, the videos you're putting out there. And I just liked the idea of helping others. So I think that's what you're continuing to do. Uh, you know, with your music or with your influencing and helping people on linkedin. You've done an amazing job. I just want to say thank you for being on the show today.

Shay Rowbottom:

Absolutely. Dave, thank you so much for having me.