Goat Wrestling Perseverance

Episode 30 - 16 Hour Apple Orchard Days at the Age of 9 with Purdeep Sangha and host Dave Swanson

June 14, 2019 Dave Swanson / Purdeep Sangha Season 2 Episode 30
Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 30 - 16 Hour Apple Orchard Days at the Age of 9 with Purdeep Sangha and host Dave Swanson
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Goat Wrestling Perseverance
Episode 30 - 16 Hour Apple Orchard Days at the Age of 9 with Purdeep Sangha and host Dave Swanson
Jun 14, 2019 Season 2 Episode 30
Dave Swanson / Purdeep Sangha

Founder of the proven Better Business System. And if you’re ready to take your business to the next level, I’m your new best friend.

My one and only goal is to get you what you truly desire from your business (regardless of what stage it is in)… without expecting you to sacrifice your sanity, personal life and freedom to get there.

I first recognized the power of the Better Business System nearly 7 years ago when I was a corporate executive for a multi-billion dollar organization, and I’ve put what I’ve learned to work to help countless entrepreneurs achieve impressive breakthroughs (even when they’ve been struggling for years).

Book

Website

Dave Swanson

Website

Book 

Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

Free Chapter of my Bestselling Book? 

Show Notes Transcript

Founder of the proven Better Business System. And if you’re ready to take your business to the next level, I’m your new best friend.

My one and only goal is to get you what you truly desire from your business (regardless of what stage it is in)… without expecting you to sacrifice your sanity, personal life and freedom to get there.

I first recognized the power of the Better Business System nearly 7 years ago when I was a corporate executive for a multi-billion dollar organization, and I’ve put what I’ve learned to work to help countless entrepreneurs achieve impressive breakthroughs (even when they’ve been struggling for years).

Book

Website

Dave Swanson

Website

Book 

Goat Wrestling Perseverance Clothes 

Free Chapter of my Bestselling Book? 

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/GWPPodcast)

Dave Swanson:

Welcome to the Goat Wrestling Perseverance podcast and my next guests that does many things. He focuses on men in business for life and for confidence. But not only that, he runs a podcast, he does coaching, consulting, has a book, he does workshops. There's not many things that he's not doing in the realm of leadership and helping guys figure out what they want to do as an entrepreneur today I have Purdeep Sangha. So pretty thank you for being on the show.

Purdeep Sangha:

Hey Dave, thanks. I appreciate the opportunity to be on your show. Oh well as they know in the audience for this, we jump right into the story. And so as we've talked about this, I'm excited to hear this story and you're going to share with the audience. Yeah, absolutely. So you want me to get started? Jump right in. Awesome. So I, I grew up in a small town in British Columbia, Canada on an apple orchard.

Purdeep Sangha:

My parents were actually immigrants from India and my dad came here with literally $11 in his pocket and he came here with next to nothing. And it's Kinda funny, he tells the story that his dad, when he dropped him off, he basically said, hey son, this is a one way ticket. You're going to Canada and you're not coming back. Make a life for yourself. So that's what my, uh, my parents did. My Dad came here. He literally had not met my mom, got married and had me and my, and my brother. And we basically grew up on an orchard. And it's interesting because my parents really didn't have a skill. They didn't have formal education and all they knew how to do was work hard. And so the only job pretty much that I could get was manual labor. And that was on an orchard. And so I remember growing up it literally in an apple then when my parents would be working, picking apples and picking cherries, they would put my brother and I in an apple, Ben Baker, basically that was our babysitter, right. Sitting in an apple, bin, while my parents were boring, but it was kind of cool because I grew up in an environment where it was a lot of physical labor, but it was different. It was like being outside, you're in nature, you're experiencing life from a completely different perspective. And, uh, let's just say at the age of nine years old, I had my first formal job on an orchard and I was getting up at four o'clock while other kids were know, enjoying their weekends are enjoying the summer holidays. I was getting up at four and getting to work at five and working. Um, and so in Canada we talked about Celsius. So it would be 40 degrees Celsius and I, and we would be working for 10, 12 hours a day, seven days a week throughout the summer on an orchard. But I can tell you that that gave me the biggest or the best work ethic that you could ever imagine. My Mom, my dad, my dad passed away last year, but he, uh, he kind of used to make fun of my mom a little bit because if we had a 10 minute break right on the dot when the, when the break was done, she'd be like, get up. We're going back to work. Because her motto was very much, you earn your money, you know, with someone else's paying us, you gotta be respectful of that. You gotta be honest and it's, and it's about putting in everything you have. So I kind of learned that from, from day one. And that's kind of led me to where I am today. But no, it wasn't, it wasn't easy. I can tell you. But you know, part of me, it was interesting because my friends throughout my teenage years and even in my early adult told my friends were working at these grocery stores or they were working at other places, but I was sitting in the sun, you know, scorching my butt off working manual labor. And at that time my parents had actually bought their orchard and I would even work. I re, I remember this was before we could afford heavy machinery and equipment, we would have to dig out trenches for the irrigation lines. And sometimes in the summers my nails would fall off because we would be hammering away at stones. And sometimes they'll just look at, um, you know, I'd be sitting there and be like, what the heck am I doing? Is this what life is about? But then there would be other times where I'd see these, you know, this massive boulder that would be in the ground and it was like a challenge. It would be like, can I get this sucker out of here? And so it would take a few hours, but as can tell you once you got, you know, that that boulder out of the ground, you look back and you say, wow, you know, I accomplished this. This is putting in, you know, hard work, labor. Um, and there was a sense of accomplishment. And I think that's something that's missed out on in today's age. And this is something that's so important. I kind of teach my kids, this is the most rewarding time for me would be in the evenings and walking through the orchard and actually looking at each individual tree and remembering, okay, this was planted five years ago and seeing how it grew to this massive tree that would be giving off these blooms, these flowers. And it was a different appreciation for life that I think a lot of people miss out on these days because of whether it's just a fast paced society that we have or the hustle and grind. But I don't think a lot of people take the time to appreciate life. I'm kind of like, hi, how I grew up. And uh, you know, it was interesting because I also, here's, here's the funniest part. Well, maybe it wasn't so funny, but I had massive allergies, like real bad allergies that I could not even breathe and I would have to work with a mask on. And they have, a lot of times it was disgusting because I would be working and it'd be like my eyes would be watering, snot would be dripping down my face and I couldn't even breathe. And my parents even said to me at times, they're like, you need to go inside. You need to stop right now because you're going to pass out or something. But something inside of me said, hey, look, if I can just push through to the next couple of hours or in the next five minutes, you know what? I'm just going to have that much more pride for myself. And that's something that I continue to do. And I can tell you there's very few times that I actually quit. I actually had to stop working because I just said, you know what? I just want to test myself. And I think that's so important, especially for guys these days. We don't test ourselves as much as we physically could. And Dave, I know you talked about the stuff you do, which is absolutely amazing, but that, you know, we talk about leadership and what physical stress, what putting yourself through from a physical standpoint can actually help you do from a mindset perspective is so important because that, you know, my background's also in neuroscience is, you know, the more you can test yourself, whether it's at the gym or physically or even at work, just taking yourself, like you say, you know, pushing yourself past the limits and being uncomfortable can make you grow. I think that's so important for today's agent. I think it's important for the next generation because for me, my whole thing right now in terms of what I do is I take the principles that I learned as a kid and how I grew up and the tough times that I had and tried to instill them in not only my kids, but also my clients. Because I see that a lot of my clients are missing out on a lot of those principles that could make them successful in life. I just so happen to learn those, uh, at a younger age, a lot younger than most people, but it's so important these days. But you know, looking back I could say my wife laughs, she's like, hey look what's going to kind of like slave labor, like child labor, what you went through. And I say, you know, sometimes it felt like that definitely for sure. But it's made me who I am as a man today and that's, you know, for, for me that is everything I look back and say, I wouldn't trade those, those years for anything in life today. Okay.

Dave Swanson:

I love this story just because it's an apple orchard and you can't really hear these stories of success of what you've learned and grew from that. But you know, there's a point that you made, I thought was interesting is that you said your parents came over without any skills and I'll, I'll, I'll fight you on this one because I think the ability to understand to work hard is a skill. Absolutely. I think that's a skill that is lacking in a lot of places like we talked about already. But think about that when you're applying yourself, you're writing a book or you're running a coaching session or workshop, you're doing all this stuff, you're loving it, right? Your love doing it, picking apples in an orchard, you're not loving doing that when you have allergies. I so, uh, you know, that kind of perseverance comes from somewhere and you know, your parents, I think mostly did it by example probably they probably showed you. What are some other ways that, you know, that thing that you felt inside that kind of kept you pushing through everything beyond them doing it by example? What was some other maybe key phrases.

Purdeep Sangha:

yeah, absolutely. I can tell you because my, my grandfather came after he asked. She immigrated to cat to cat it after my parents and my, he was in the, he was in the military and my dad was actually in the police force prior to coming into Canada. And it was interesting because my, my grandfather, this is the most important thing that I remember. Um, and he taught me two things. One is always have values and stay true to your values. As a man, that is the most important thing because he used to say that, you know, people could take away your certifications, they can take away your money, they can take away your home, they can even take away that people that you love, they can take away the shirt off your back. But the one thing they can't take away from you is your values.

Purdeep Sangha:

And as a man, that is the most important thing. So I think that stuck with me because at times I look back and I say that I struggled in life, wasn't the external circumstances, you know, go being in the orchard and having, you know, the heat and, and just that physical work, working 1216 hours a day sometimes it wasn't the tough part. That was actually quite easy compared to all of the other stuff that I dealt with in life most, most importantly, when I strayed from my values because I didn't feel like I was the man that I wanted to be. And that was, I think, the most trying time in my life. And I looked back and I think my grandfather, you know, he would say other things like, you know, the clothes don't make the man, the man make the clothes and something that you don't hear very much these days. But a lot of the old school generation really live to was your word is your bond. When you give someone your word, especially yourself, you know, this is this thing that I worked with a lot of entrepreneurs on is, is self integrity. That is the most important thing that you could ever practice in life. Because if you are true to your word, to yourself, you are more likely. And actually Harvard studies have shown this to be successful in life. So those are the principles that are really stand towards and, and really live by it. And that's thanks to my parents and my, my grandfather.

Dave Swanson:

Yeah, I think it's amazing to have those kinds of role models and I think you and I can agree that, you know, we're trying to be those kind of role models for our kids and other generations. And you know, you, you sparked up this image that I had. You know, one of the things that taught me about perseverance beyond wrestling at goat was that playing basketball, you know, I was speaking to 300 high school kids just a few weeks ago and I was telling them about playing basketball. I remember on Friday nights, you know, people would be driving by my house, they could see me out there playing basketball and they were going to a movie, we're going to do something else and they wouldn't stop, you know, they, they'd wave and keep on going. And I'd be out there, you know, 10 to 15 hours a day playing basketball and just working on my skills because the priority for me was getting a basketball scholarship. And I said I would do this until my fingers would bleed. You know, I would put bandaids on and I would literally dribble a basketball until my fingers would bleed. I would go through a new basketball, like rubbing the nubs off the basketball every other month. Like every two months I had to get a new basketball. And when I explained this a few weeks ago to 300 high school kids, like their mouths were all open and just like, why would you work that hard? And I think, you know, for me, you, you're describing the same thing. You know, you're at the apple orchard and you have friends. Like why are you working 12 to 16 hour days? You know, in the summer when you could be out messing around doing this and don't realize that that instituted something into you and you had great role models. You had the work that was going to be there, but now doesn't life just seem a little bit easier when you go and reflect on those times?

Purdeep Sangha:

Oh, most definitely. You know, I feel like that'll, you know, those old men that talk about, I had to walk three miles just to get water. I, I, you know, I talked to my kids about the stories that you know, that I have is as a, as a kid because it wasn't as easy as it is today. But you know, that's part of life. That's a, that's how it is. And life. You know what, you brought up an interesting point. Life from a certain part seems easier today, but in some aspects it seems tougher just because we have so much technology. I feel like family values are changing, that you don't have that same camaraderie in some, you know, certain aspects. So I think society's gingy for me personally, because I grew up in such a big household, a big family, I think that's the tougher part for me and I, that's why I do the work that I do because if I can help people be more successful in their business and in life, they can raise happier families, they can be there for their children, they can spend more time with their kids rather than hustling and grinding out work. No. So what happens, I was like my parents, you know, we were in the same vicinity. They were hustling and they were grinding from my work perspective, but they had their children there. We were all working together from that standpoint. So we're a family unit was still together. And I think that's a cool thing about family businesses is, you know, that have opportunity to work together. Um, and, and have the kids be involved as well.

Dave Swanson:

Yeah, I think that's a kind of a foreign concept for family businesses. I know it still happens quite frequently around the world, but you know, the, the next thing that you're working on, I'm pretty excited about this. I know you are too. You know, looking at this program you have coming out called ThreeSixty abundance, I'd love to hear, you know, in the audience to hear a little bit more about what this kind of program is you're putting out there.

Purdeep Sangha:

Yeah, absolutely. So I very soon realized when I started working with entrepreneurs that, uh, again, my background is also in business strategies and tactics. I've been studying that for decades, but I also studied neuroscience performance psychology and mindfulness is that 80% of the work that I was doing in terms of helping people be successful in business in life was nothing to do with the business strategies and tactics. It had everything to do with things is traditionally known as mindset, emotional intelligence, being able to align what I called their inner energy, um, because there's a lot of people that have the right mindset, but their emotions aren't aligned and then they're not able to effectively do what they want to do. And so I would help people, um, basically say, okay, let's get you up to speed with your clarity, your confidence in your internal momentum before we start operating on the business technical stuff. So that is part of this program that is the main component of this program because it's, it's what I call taking a person from a surviving state to a thriving state to where they have the control, they have the confidence, they have the internal momentum and clarity that they can say, okay, give me whatever you have from a business standpoint. I'm just going to crush it. So that's what this business, um, this three 60 abundance is about, is really getting people transforming themselves to the level where they need to be successful in life. And so I've, I've been working with one on one clients, um, over the last number of years and I've really taken that approach and put it into a group coaching program, which is a, made it a lot more affordable for the everyday entrepreneur to be able to access this program. So I'm super excited because my goal, my mission is really to help as many men as I can. You know, my mission right now is, and I see this and I'm so glad I'm talking to you because it seems like we are the same page and from a values perspective is that I think there's, there is a lack of leadership in the world today, especially from men. We have, um, some interesting people and some very powerful positions that are not representing men to the degree that they should. And I think the rest of us men have to step up. And I think that's my personal mission is really helping men have the clarity and the confidence to really step up in life and really not only deliver for their family, but deliver for their communities over further society for their country. As a whole.

Dave Swanson:

Well, I love that concept surviving to thriving. I think that's definitely something out there in a program for the audience to even, you know, go check out to go do and, uh, you know, pretty, I'm so glad that you're able to be on the show today. It's been a privilege and I'm glad to hear the Orchard Story. Definitely one of my favorites so far. So thank you again.

Purdeep Sangha:

Yeah. Thanks Dave. I totally appreciate the opportunity. I wish you all the best.